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Photons simulate time travel in the lab

Physics World - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 09:06
Protocol could break quantum-encryption systems
Categories: Conventional Science

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter discovers lunar hydrogen more abundant on Moon’s pole-facing slopes

Astronomy Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 05:00
Explorers are excited because these deposits could be mined if they are sufficiently abundant.
Categories: Astronomy

Hubble captures rare triple-moon conjunction

Astronomy Magazine - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 05:00
These so-called Galilean satellites complete orbits around Jupiter with durations ranging from two to 17 days.
Categories: Astronomy

New Horizons returns new images of Pluto

Astronomy Magazine - Wed, 02/04/2015 - 20:30
These are the first photos of the Pluto system for the spacecraft's optical navigation phase of the mission.
Categories: Astronomy

New optical fibre shortens laser pulses the easy way

Physics World - Wed, 02/04/2015 - 09:07
Kagome structure and noble gas work together to create short, powerful infrared bursts
Categories: Conventional Science

Rosetta swoops in for a close encounter

Astronomy Magazine - Wed, 02/04/2015 - 05:00
The February 14 flyby will allow the spacecraft to sample the innermost parts of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s atmosphere.
Categories: Astronomy

New infrared view of the Trifid Nebula reveals new variable stars far beyond

Astronomy Magazine - Wed, 02/04/2015 - 05:00
They are the first such stars found that lie in the central plane of the Milky Way beyond its central bulge.
Categories: Astronomy

Meade appoints new president

Astronomy Magazine - Wed, 02/04/2015 - 05:00
Victor Aniceto, former vice president of sales and marketing, will succeed Joe Lupica.
Categories: Astronomy

“Live fast, die young” galaxies lose the gas that keeps them alive

Astronomy Magazine - Tue, 02/03/2015 - 05:00
A pilot study looking at galaxies that die young has found some might shoot out this gas early on, causing them to redden and kick the bucket prematurely.
Categories: Astronomy

Meteorite may represent “bulk background” of Mars’ battered crust

Astronomy Magazine - Tue, 02/03/2015 - 05:00
NWA 7034 has been shown to be a 4.4-billion-year-old chunk of the martian crust, the first such sample to make it to Earth.
Categories: Astronomy

Galactic dust sounds death knell for BICEP2 gravitational wave claim

Physics World - Tue, 02/03/2015 - 04:09
Joint analysis of Planck, BICEP2 and Keck data finds no cosmological B-mode signal
Categories: Conventional Science

Ultrasound puts a new twist on light

Physics World - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 05:12
System sculpts and guides Bessel beams
Categories: Conventional Science

The telltale signs of a galactic merger

Astronomy Magazine - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 05:00
This galaxy has drifted too close to another nearby galaxy and the dramatic interaction has twisted its spiral arms out of shape.
Categories: Astronomy

Cat scan of nearby supernova remnant reveals frothy interior

Astronomy Magazine - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 05:00
Astronomers have generated a new 3-D map of Cassiopeia A’s interior, using the astronomical equivalent of a CAT scan.
Categories: Astronomy

Hubble HiRes of Andromeda

RS2 Fora Comments - Sun, 02/01/2015 - 11:22

Super-high resolution image of Andromeda from Hubble (NASA/ESA):

Took me over a day to download that image... it's BIG. But quite fascinating. Been running some analysis on it. Most of the bright "stars" are in the foreground, not part of the nebula. You can identify these because the adjacent dusty areas are not illuminated as they should be. Actually, there are very few self-luminous objects in the cloudy regions.

If you zoom in too much, the picture becomes a maze of colored blobs. Understand that these are not actual objects, but an artifact of image processing--a digital representation of the dusty regions that cannot be isolated into a pixel set, so you get a color splattering (zoom in ANY high-res image of a dusty pattern, and you will see the same thing).

I was able to isolate the core, which for a 40,000 pixel wide file, is very small--only about 112 pixels across. If that is a star approximately the same size as our sun, then this image is showing a solar system with the outer blue band of gas/dust being about 3.2 AU (yep, Astronomical Units) in radius--about the same distance to our asteroid belt. Which means the Andromeda nebula, itself, is a whopping 38 light days away. That puts it well within the gravitational limit, as well as optical range.

 

Categories: RS2 Research

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