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Flash Physics: New solar-energy model, Persis Drell named Stanford provost, gas sensors in a jiffy

Physics World - Wed, 11/16/2016 - 06:22
Today's selection of need-to-know updates from the world of physics
Categories: Conventional Science

Scientists found a valley on Mercury

Astronomy Magazine - Wed, 11/16/2016 - 05:00
This valley may have been formed in a very Earth-like way
Categories: Astronomy

New trailer for Hidden Figures will pull on your heartstrings

Astronomy Magazine - Wed, 11/16/2016 - 05:00
Trailer shows what the women go through to achieve the impossible
Categories: Astronomy

A Subsurface Ocean May Give Pluto a Heavy Heart

Astronomy Magazine - Wed, 11/16/2016 - 05:00
Pluto may be the latest place in the solar system to show evidence of liquid water.
Categories: Astronomy

General Discussion • Re: Inter-Body Stability Distance

RS2 Research - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 14:39
Does this presentation of the problem take into account the idea you mentioned of a Primary and Secondary spatial location? My understanding is still too fuzzy to assess whether that's a relevant factor or not, here.

Statistics: Posted by SoverT — Tue Nov 15, 2016 2:39 pm

Categories: RS Research

General Discussion • Inter-Body Stability Distance

RS2 Research - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 12:26
rossum wrote:
I have a solid background in differential equations and solid/fluid dynamics i.e. pressure based systems.

Perhaps you can solve this problem (for a simulation). Gopi has not been able to figure it out--something do to with variables going to infinity.

Given two motions, A and B, expressed as spheres with coordinates that define a center of gravity, having gravitational limits G and masses M (M being the net inward speed):


All motion outside of the gravitational limit progresses linearly outward at the speed of light. All motion inside the gravitational limit follows the equations of a diminishing spherical surface. Determine an equation to find D, the point of equilibrium.

Though this was done for astronomical applications, it should also work for inter-atomic distances where the center is the net, inward motion from atomic rotation.

Statistics: Posted by bperet — Tue Nov 15, 2016 12:26 pm

Categories: RS Research

Astronomy and Cosmology • Re: Are planets setting the sun's pace?

RS2 Research - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 12:07
duane wrote:
The End of the World - Conjunctions, The Red Dragon, & The Day of the Lord Decoded.

Going through it now; about 28 minutes in he is talking about the Aztec and their 52-year covenant with the devil--every 52 yeas, they perform a ritual to renew their covenant. As the --daniel papers point out, most accounts are scaled wrong, for example, Atlantis sank 900 years prior to Solon, not 9000, and the Sumerian "year" is actually a day.

Being raised Roman Catholic... if I apply the same scale error, I found that 52 times a year I had to attend a ritual at the church to renew my covenant... each and every Sunday--the "sun's day." Got to wonder if there is an astronomic correlation.

Statistics: Posted by bperet — Tue Nov 15, 2016 12:07 pm

Categories: RS Research

General Discussion • Re: Revisting the exploding atom

RS2 Research - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 11:31
rossum wrote:
So far I used C++ and Fortran for such things so I should be able to read Java.

Java is much like C++ and I am keeping the code simple and descriptive. I prefer "readable" over efficiency right now.

rossum wrote:
I also tried to put together some code for these kinds of things (quite hard to read though). Could you also describe the code conceptually in equations or diagrams?

I am not a "math guy," so it will be diagrams and flow charts.

Statistics: Posted by bperet — Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:31 am

Categories: RS Research

LRC Research • Re: Introduction to Doug's RSt

RS2 Research - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 10:45
Hi rossum.

Thanks for getting back to me on this. I knew you were referring to K.V. K.'s article, but he was never able to make any progress along the lines he suggested, but, as you write:


What I really meant was that anyone can now calculate the spectra (even for molecules) using this Nehru's approach, but probably nobody except me tried.


This is news to me. Have you posted the calculations somewhere? If so, please point me to them.

As far as the nature and origin of quantum spin goes, the LST community doesn't have a clue. All they know is that it is a conundrum yet to be solved. How can a particle with no spatial extent possess "intrinsic angular momentum?" It can't, but even if it could, the need to rotate its spin axis through 720 degrees to return the particle to its original state, is a complete mystery.

In the LRC's RSt, however, there is no spin axis, as the 3D oscillation is not a spherical wave, but a pulsation of volume, if you will, and the 720 degree cycle is easily explained.

But, again, the important thing for us to understand is how Larson has revolutionized the nature of space and time and the phenomenon of motion. Until we recognize that a repetitive change in scale constitutes motion and follow the consequences, the science of theoretical physics will ever be bound to the science of vector motion and mathematics will forever be hampered by imaginary numbers.

Statistics: Posted by dbundy — Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:45 am

Categories: RS Research

Gold nanospheres confine light to smallest volume ever

Physics World - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 09:23
"World's smallest magnifying glass" uses surface plasmons
Categories: Conventional Science

Flash Physics: Asteroid missions, mathematical physicist bags C N R Rao Prize, ultrashort electron emission

Physics World - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 08:40
Today's selection of need-to-know updates from the world of physics
Categories: Conventional Science

Project Blue kicks off citizen-driven campaign

Astronomy Magazine - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 05:00
The team’s Kickstarter campaign could contribute to a historic effort
Categories: Astronomy

‘Ice cauldrons’ could tells us if there’s life on Mars

Astronomy Magazine - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 05:00
These craters be a key ingredient in Martian life
Categories: Astronomy

General Discussion • Re: Revisting the exploding atom

RS2 Research - Tue, 11/15/2016 - 02:40
I am definitely interested in programming (or at least reading the code for) a workable RS2 simulation. I have a solid background in differential equations and solid/fluid dynamics i.e. pressure based systems. So far I used C++ and Fortran for such things so I should be able to read Java. I also tried to put together some code for these kinds of things (quite hard to read though). Could you also describe the code conceptually in equations or diagrams?


Yes, RS2 is pressure based.


This is quite exciting news for me: even though I thought so, I never read it so directly so I was't sure until now. Before the change of this forum to phpBB I started working on a blog that was supposed to teach the mathematical apparatus of quantum mechanics and following Nehru's articles on QM show it's relevancy for RS2 with a little expansion and corrections of mine (Nehru made some errors along the way). My point is that it is exactly a 'pressure based' system.

Statistics: Posted by rossum — Tue Nov 15, 2016 2:40 am

Categories: RS Research

Astronomy and Cosmology • Re: Are planets setting the sun's pace?

RS2 Research - Mon, 11/14/2016 - 23:22
a long but interesting video
i didn't get all the way through but will try again
some of this should be useful
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Wsq1hJvftg

The End of the World - Conjunctions, The Red Dragon, & The Day of the Lord Decoded.

the destructive resonance of conjunctions of Mars, Earth, the moon, Venus, Mercury, and the Sun

Statistics: Posted by duane — Mon Nov 14, 2016 11:22 pm

Categories: RS Research

Schistosomiasis parasite moves using an unusual swimming stoke

Physics World - Mon, 11/14/2016 - 09:15
New understanding of how larvae reach human hosts could help prevent disease
Categories: Conventional Science

Flash Physics: IOP honours six physicists, APS retracts Trump statement, quantum physicists advise World Economic Forum

Physics World - Mon, 11/14/2016 - 06:19
Today's selection of need-to-know updates from the world of physics
Categories: Conventional Science

3D models shed some light on Beagle 2 lander’s fate, but questions remain

Astronomy Magazine - Mon, 11/14/2016 - 05:00
How engineers are investigating from 34 million miles away
Categories: Astronomy

The woman who named the moon and clocked variable stars

Astronomy Magazine - Mon, 11/14/2016 - 05:00
Mary Adela Blagg was a talented astronomer in two fields, but her work has been forgotten.
Categories: Astronomy

General Discussion • Nuclides "out of range" (Problem)

RS2 Research - Sun, 11/13/2016 - 14:37
While creating a nuclide reference database for RS2 research, I noticed some inconsistencies in the data--namely, that there are nuclides listed that have an "impossible" structure to them. Out of 5511 nuclides, 295 fall into this category.

The problem: In Larson's RS, the mass of any nuclide is determined by the equation: 2Z+G, where Z is the atomic number and G is the number of "gravitational charges" (in RS2, the charge from captured neutrinos).

2Z occurs because conventional science measures atomic mass by "charge" (vibration, G), and a vibration is half a rotation. Each rotation therefore appears to be two charges. The gravitational charge, being a vibration, is the basic "atomic mass unit."

What this means: the atomic number of an element in the RS is determined by its magnetic rotation, having a mass of 2Z. That means the minimum mass of any element is twice the atomic number. From there, you go up by single units of gravitational charge (vibrational mass) until you reach a point where the vibrational mass is so great that it overwhelms the rotational system--and destroys it (probably α-decay). Numerically, the maximum mass for a nuclide would be 4Z-1 (you need another 2Z worth of gravitational charge to cancel out the rotation).

Of the data obtained:

  • 280 nuclides have a mass less than 2Z.
  • 13 have a mass greater than 4Z-1
Gopi happened to stop by when I discovered this problem and suggested that they may be short-lived atomic fragments, since they all come from particle accelerators. If that is the case, he suggested the lifetimes would be very short, in the order of a few natural units of time. However, the data shows that the average half-life of these 280 nuclides is 7.6 HOURS. Quite a bit more than 152 attoseconds. The 13 that went too high had a much shorter half-life, being 1.02 seconds--which is still large, compared to an attosecond.

When studying "natural isotopes," I ran into this problem with only Helium-3, the helion. What I found was a "misidentification," discussed here: Isotopes, compound rotations (n, 1H, 3He). (Basically, the helion is a compound particle, like hydrogen, and has nothing to do with helium--probably why it behaves so differently.)

Also, they are now including data for Element 118 (mass values 293, 294, 295), which Larson says cannot exist, because it is beyond the range that a motion can be expressed in a 3D reference system. Half-lives there are in the order of 1/1000th of a second.

I suspect the problem has to do with they way physicists report data. For example, if you take a glass bottle and smash it against the wall, is each piece of glass STILL a "lower mass" version of the bottle? After all, it is still "glass." That is basically what they are doing in particle accelerators.

I am not sure what these impact events are doing to the rotational/vibration structures, and I currently do not have a way to model them. It may have been converted to a compound motion, but don't understand why the long half-lives would exist.

If you are using the research database, you can get a list of the 280 "under range" nuclides by:

Code:

SELECT * FROM physics.nubase WHERE a<2*z ORDER BY z,a
And the "over-range" by:

Code:

SELECT * FROM physics.nubase WHERE a>4*z-1 ORDER BY z,a

Statistics: Posted by bperet — Sun Nov 13, 2016 2:37 pm

Categories: RS Research

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